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Bust the Myth: AI is not always Absolutely Intimidating

 

Much has been said about arti cial intelligence (AI) and its potential to someday completely displace humans at our workplace. Vladyslav Koshelyev, a media and marketing practitioner and a member of The IT Society Editorial Committee, believes otherwise. In this issue, he shares with The IT Society why as far as he is concerned the rise of AI is more exciting than worrisome.

 

 

Q: Question, VK : Vladyslav Koshelyev

 

 

Q: What has inspired your interest in AI?

VK: As a teenager, I was an avid reader of Ray Kurzweil’s books and was deeply intrigued by his theories about the future of humankind and technology. In the book, “The Age of Intelligent Machines”, Kurzweil predicts how the intellectual capacity of AI would become comparable and eventually surpass that of humans. His belief that AI will one day enjoy a collaborative and symbiotic relationship with humans was awe-inspiring. That was when my interest in AI was rst seeded. At the time, Kurzweil’s books seemed to be science ction, however today we see that most of his predictions has come true. My smartphone today is more powerful than a mainframe computer in my childhood days. And it’s just a start. 

 

 

Q: Can you share some AI developments that you are excited about? 

VK: Sure. I am very excited about AI starting to help creative professionals. In a recent experiment, the advertising agency McCann Japan used its AI software to analyse a brief and successfully create a new campaign. While the project didn’t win any award, we should remember that digital technologies develop exponentially and will progress ever faster. 

 

More recently, a pop artist, Taryn Southern released a human/AI collaborative album. While the AI did the music composition, Taryn took care of the vocal melodies and lyrics. The result has all the ingredients of a good pop song – a catchy tune, a smooth progression, etc. 

 

 

Both developments are very different. Yet, they not only hint at the potential of AI to do amazing work in time to come, but also showcase that it is indeed possible for AI and humans to work together hand in hand, side by side. 

 

 

Q:  So are you looking forward to working alongside AI?

VK: I very much do. Although I should note, this doesn’t mean my work will become easier. It’s actually the opposite. When I rst started working in the digital media industry, my job was much simpler. Every week, as part of my routine, I had to do the same three/four tasks. They were technically complex and time consuming, but repetitive. Once I gured them out, I was all set. 

 

Today, there is an algorithm that takes care of these tasks. The good news is I don’t have to do them anymore. The not so good news is that my work has become more complex. Instead of doing these same tasks week after week, now my time is spent working with partners to understand their organisations, strategising how I can help them do better and nding solutions that provide greater value.

 

Work has become less predictable, more challenging – but also more interesting. I am not afraid of losing my job to an AI but I know for sure that I will have to work harder and learn faster than ever to adapt. 

 

 

Q: Since AI can bring so much good, why do you think people are apprehensive about its rise? 

VK: It is good to be apprehensive. Technology is always a double-edged sword. When used well, it can help us to do more and better. However, if used for the wrong intent, it can be dangerous. It is therefore important that we are aware of both good and bad possibilities – so that we can take proactive actions to prevent negative impact even as we enjoy the bene ts AI brings.

 

It is understandable that people are concerned that AI may displace them. Although my own experience is that AI did change the focus of my work, but it did not replace me. In fact, it has given me the opportunity to dedicate my energy to more value-added work and hone my ability in aspects that truly matter. Similarly, in the example I shared earlier about Taryn Southern and her new album – she could focus on the composition and stories her songs tell while letting AI handle the more minute details.

 

 

Q: What is an area that you hope to see more AI developments in?

VK: I look forward to the use of AI in healthcare. Traditionally, we rely a lot on the expertise of individual doctors. This expertise is usually lost when the doctor leaves. By integrating AI with healthcare systems, this problem will be mitigated because the system can objectively analyse a huge library of different cases and identify best practices; it can possibly even suggest preventive measures.

 

 

ABOUT THE MAN 

 

 

Q: What do you love about working in the technology industry?

VK: History is de ned by technology, influencing the rise and fall of great states. They rose because they developed advanced technology, and they fell because they were unable to keep up. As part of the industry, you get to be involved in the process and change the way people live, in the present, and for generations to come.

   

   

Q: What drew you to Singapore? 

VK: I love the culture, architecture, landscapes and the climate among many other things. The weather makes me forsake my computer for the great outdoors, be it for a get-together with friends or a walk. The eclectic mix of towering skyscrapers and colourful shophouses combines with the many smart city technologies and ethnically rich population to make for a very vibrant place to live, work and play in.

 

 

“Just because AI could develop abilities beyond that of humankind, it doesn’t mean we would be supplanted. Instead, people and AI will become partners to create a better world together. I am a firm believer in that.” 

 

 

 

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